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    Below you will find the Syllabi for all courses that I will be teaching this year.

     



    AP English Language and Composition Syllabus 2020-2021 Effingham College and Career Academy Instructor: Erin Wright (912) 754-5610 ewright@effingham.k12.ga.us 

    College Board Approved Syllabus for AP Language and Composition, 2021-2022 School Year

    *Parents and Students: Please sign in the required sections highlighted below. At the end of the syllabus, you will find a section that must be completed by the parent or guardian.

    Supply List for your personal use:

      • *Hand sanitizer-for your personal use
      • *Tissues-for your personal use
    • Earbuds for ChromeBook or whatever personal computer device you use. Purchase these for $1 at Dollar Tree; place in a plastic ziplock bag with your name inside the bag. Submit to me by August 16th.
    • Pens/paper/highlighters/sticky notes
    • *I highly recommend a planner. You can download many for free, or choose to purchase a hard copy planner for your use.

    Grading

    All formative assessments will count as 40% of your grade.

    All summative assessments will count as 60% of your grade.

    Effingham College and Career Academy

    Make-Up Work and Late Work Procedures

    Effingham College and Career Academy has established make-up work and late work procedures with regard to the acceptance and credit awarded for work that is turned in by students beyond a set deadline.  The expectation is that all students will turn in all assignments on time; however, when this does not occur, we need to encourage students to show responsibility for their learning by completing the assignments.

    The philosophy of awarding partial credit for late work takes into account the following: the teacher had a valid reason for assigning the work, the assignment is aligned to the curriculum, and the assignment is designed to help inform the student and teacher of the student’s level of mastery of the course standards.

    Late Work is defined as any work completed and turned in after a designated due date.  ECCA will follow the following procedures for late work:

    Students will have three days from the designated due date to turn in work.

    1 day late = a deduction of 11 points off of the earned grade

    2 days late = a deduction of 22 points off of the earned grade

    3 days late = a deduction of 33 points off of the earned grade

    _________________________ (student signature required)

    After 3 days : In an Advanced Placement class, you are expected to turn your assignments in on time. Any completed assignment turned in after day three can score no higher than 25%. ______________________ (parent signature required)

    No late work will be accepted the last week of the grading period for each nine weeks.

    Make-Up Work is defined as any assignments or tests students need to complete due to an excused absence.  Students may make up assignments for full credit by following the procedure below according to the Effingham County Make-Up Policy:

    Students have three days to make up any work missed from an absence. If a student has not turned in make-up work by day three, then refer to the late work procedures listed above.

    Note that previously announced projects, tests or quizzes that have been scheduled BEFORE a student is absent MUST be made up the day the student returns to school.

    Schoology and Classroom Procedures

    I will be using the learning management system Schoology.  A daily agenda will be uploaded to this platform every day. This is your primary resource for retrieving homework assignments, completing projects, downloading notes or watching lectures and/or videos. I am requiring you to check the Schoology site every day. It needs to be a part of your daily routine.  You will utilize this platform through your Chromebooks, so detailed instructions will be provided in class during the first few days of school.  

    If you would like to look at the Schoology platform click here:  http://bit.ly/schoologyStudent                                              

    Academic Integrity Statement

    Honesty, integrity, and mutual respect are necessary for true learning.  To maintain and support the academic honesty, integrity, and mutual respect of the school community by completing all assigned work, activities, and tests in an honorable manner according to the stated policies without engaging in cheating, fraud, or plagiarism is the responsibility of the student.

    _______________________ (student signature required)

     

    _______________________ (parent signature required)

    Discipline

    All ECCA and ECSD policies regarding discipline can be found in the student handbook. You will be expected to adhere to these policies

    Course Overview

     Eleventh grade students in AP English Language and Composition read and carefully analyze a broad and challenging range of nonfiction prose selections, deepening their awareness of rhetoric and how language works. This course is taught at a college level and is designed solely for college bound students who have demonstrated academic excellence in their prior English classes and who have the ability to master an extremely advanced program of study requiring many outside assignments and readings. Through close reading and frequent writing, students develop their ability to work with language and text with a greater awareness of purpose and strategy, while strengthening their composition skills. As students advance in their writing, they refine their written work through conferences with peers and the instructor in order to develop sophisticated and critically thoughtful arguments and analyses. They will also critically reflect on their written work, producing multiple drafts of selected assignments as part of the writing process. Students learn to use deductive reasoning in their essays (moving from the general to the particular) and inductive reasoning (moving from the particular to the specific). 

    Students are exposed to a wide range of nonfiction sources to serve as models and examples. Students will read expository, analytical, and argumentative texts from a variety of authors and historical contexts, in the form of essays, letters, and speeches. Additionally, students incorporate the study of visual rhetoric, examining media such as graphs, charts, infographics, photographs, films, advertisements, comic strips, and videos. 

    Students will prepare for the AP English Language and Composition Exam, scheduled for May 18, 2018, and may be granted advanced placement at a post-secondary school, college credit, or both as a result of satisfactory performance. 

    Course Objectives

    the student will be able to: 

    • Identify audience, purpose, and strategies, both in written text and visual mediums 
    • Analyze the types of arguments that writers use 
    • Write formally and informally for a variety of audiences 
    • Write expository, analytical, and argumentative essays 
    • Write within varying time limits, including single draft, timed assignments and multiple draft assignments requiring conferencing and revision 
    • Synthesize ideas and information from various sources, including required readings and independent research from qualified, reputable sources 
    • Know how to interpret information presented in notes and citations 
    • Use the conventions of standard written English 
    • Build on previous knowledge of MLA citations; compare and contrast MLA with APA and Chicago Style citations 
    • Develop a strong, sophisticated, college-level vocabulary, both for understanding complex texts and for nuanced writing 
    • Develop a sense of sentence structure, with attention to the use of phrases, clauses, types of sentences, word order, and sentence patterns. Explain how changes to a sentence affect its tone, purpose, and credibility of the speaker 

     

    Primary and Secondary Course Texts Each student will have a copy of: 

    • The Language of Composition, 2nd edition, edited by Renee H. Shea, Lawrence Scanlon, and Robin Dissin Aufses Additional readings and assignments may be derived from the following texts: 
    • 50 Essays: A Portable Anthology, ed. Samuel Cohen 
    • Thank You For Arguing, Jay Heinrichs 
    • Everyone’s an Author, ed. Andrea Lunsford, Michal Brody, Lisa Ede, Beverly J. Moss,Carole Clark Papper, and Keith Walters 
    • Everything’s an Argument, ed. Andrea A. Lunsford, John J. Ruszkiewicz, and Keith Walters 
    • Fifty Great Essays, ed. Robert Diyanni 
    • A Pocket Style Handbook, Diane Hacker; Nancy Sommers 
    • Articles from current events (reports, arguments, speeches, op-eds) shall be used, where they are appropriate and are of rhetorical interest for the course, in addition to films, video clips, photos, infographics, and other sources. 

    Essential Questions Covered: 

    • How do the writer’s style, voice, audience, and language affect the meaning and purpose of the text? 
    • How does an analysis of text and visuals include the scrutiny of linguistic and rhetorical choices and subtleties of point of view? 
    • How does an understanding of rhetoric, style, voice, and audience contribute to the author’s purpose? 
    • How does effective oral communication contribute to a successful professional life? 
    • How will preplanning and organizing as well as using correct grammar strengthen a written work? 
    • Why effective research skills are important in our technological, information based society? 
    • How can writing be both formal and informal? 
    • How will pre-planning, peer editing, revision, and teacher feedback improve writing a formal essay? 
    • How will the AP English Language and Composition course help me make the transition from high school to college? 

    Course Expectations Actively participate: Writing is not an isolated procedure that requires one person and his/her thoughts, but rather it engages with various conversations and ideas. Therefore, if you are to succeed in this course, you must be willing to interact with your classmates during activities so we can enhance our writing and communication skills. Expect class discussion, Socratic Seminars, and read around. Additionally, we will not always be taking part in whole group or small group discussion, so student engagement during lecture or independent work is expected. Be prepared: This includes having all your materials for the day, having your homework completed, and being on time. If you are not prepared, you will not be able to fully participate; hence, you undermine your own journey towards academic excellence. You are responsible for your own learning. This year-long endeavor requires trust in our peers, our voices, and our persistence, so bring a positive attitude to class, and strive to do your very best. 

    Student Evaluation During each academic quarter, assignments, course preparation and participation shall be assigned points of varying values that will be clearly spelled out to students via rubrics, syllabi, and cover sheets. Students should expect to be assigned a graded evaluation for the following types of assignments: 

    • Six major papers, along with smaller, related assignments, such as initial drafts (100 points for most major papers; assignments will include smaller checkpoint items including credit for drafts and peer review). 
    • Reading responses via directed questions, journals, and short writing assignments 
    • Timed writing assignments from AP Practice Tests 
    • Participation in formal class discussions such as Socratic Seminars 
    • Quizzes on vocabulary and academic terminology 
    • Short essays written over the course of a few days focused on rhetorical analysis, arguments, and synthesis 
    • Presentations of various research/analytical findings 
    • Maintenance of a writing portfolio, including reflections on its contents 
    • Documentation of peer review--students meet in small groups to help each other brainstorm, draft, revise, edit, and polish written work. Students are often required to give each other focused feedback, using documents designed for the task at hand. Students will be asked to turn in their feedback documentation with final drafts 
    • Informal writing activities including quick-writes, journal entries, writing portions of essays (introduction, body, conclusion), practicing thesis statements, and rewriting paragraphs 

    The instructor and students will conference about progress and work periodically throughout the course. An unsatisfactory piece of writing may be revised or reworked, at the teacher’s discretion, then resubmitted for a higher grade within a fixed period of time, without penalty. 

    Late assignments are not accepted unless prior arrangements have been made, or unavoidable circumstances arise. This will be evaluated on an individual basis. In some cases, late assignments may be graded for partial credit, at my discretion. Any assignment that is missed due to an absence is subject to the ECCA handbook policy, allowing for three days per absence depending on whether or not the absence(s) is excused. Assignments missing due to absences will be recorded in the gradebook as missing until the assignment is received and evaluated. It is always a good idea to submit assignments through Google Drive to avoid late penalties. 

    The goal this year is to post the assignments for each unit on Schoology. 

    Assignments: 1st Nine Weeks Unit 1: Introduction to Rhetoric The Language of Composition 

    The course begins with summer reading assignments. Using the work data sheets completed over the summer on the articles assigned, students will devise their own claim and use their sources to defend that claim. This writing assignment will serve as a diagnostic tool for each student. Students will share their literary roles from the non-fiction text required for summer reading and participate in a Socratic Seminar building on the concepts taught in Honors English 10. 

    For the independent nonfiction selection, students use the basics of rhetoric, as outlined in chapters one and two of The Language of Composition, to complete a series of assignments. The assignments require students to apply the concepts such as the rhetorical triangle, persona, and style to their independent reading books. While completing these assignments, students practice annotation and using dialectical journals with Joan Didion’s “Santa Ana Winds” and John F. Kennedy’s 1961 Inaugural Address. Additionally, students conduct close readings of texts from current events, such as presidential addresses and responses from op-ed pages of major papers, such as The New York Times. Students also start to analyze visual examples of rhetoric, including the covers of their independent reading selections and advertisements. In addition to paying close attention to the subject, audience, and speaker for the images, students take into consideration the use of color, medium, and composition. Rhetorical terminology is reviewed and new terminology introduced. Students will keep a working rhetorical terminology list in their portfolio (see major paper #1). 

    Major Paper #1: The first major paper is an expository essay focusing on rhetorical fundamentals based on students’ independent summer reading text. Drawing from previous assignments, students will identify the speaker’s primary argument or arguments, explain how the speaker makes his or her argument, and then evaluate the speaker’s effectiveness. As with the essay connected to the common reading text, students will compose an initial draft. They will complete a peer review and peer review sheet which they must discuss together and turn in with the final draft. The second draft will be given to the instructor, using the grading criteria as a guide to focus the feedback given. After time to reflect and make revisions, students will submit their final drafts. When the final drafts are returned to students, they will also start their writing portfolios for the year. In the portfolios, students will keep final drafts of their work, along with reflections on their progress throughout the year. 

    Unit 2: Education The Language of Composition page 175 Guiding Questions 

    • What does it mean to be truly educated? 
    • What is the purpose of education? 
    • To what extent schools serve the goals of a true education? 
    • What is “best” when it comes to education? 

    Unit Goals 

    • Discuss rhetorical choices and moves (questions about purpose, meaning, and structure) 
    • Practice crafting a thesis statement 
    • Develop a working vocabulary for logical organization; apply strong transitions to writing 
    • Discuss how to utilize information from graphs and infographics in writing 
    • Utilize information found in footnotes and discuss the function of footnotes. 
    • Continue to conduct close readings of texts with an awareness of language features, both independently and as a group. 
    • Begin to examine previous AP exam questions, including reading selections with multiple choice questions. 
    • Evaluate the quality/bias of information sources on and offline 
    • Practice the synthesis of information from disparate sources into an essay that both informs and speculates 
    • Learn, practice, and master the strategies necessary to write an AP synthesis essay 
    • Review MLA citation in-text citations and works cited pages 

    Major Paper #2: The second major paper of the year requires students to form an argument about the guiding questions for this unit--What does it mean to be educated? What is the purpose of education? Students will then support their argument with carefully selected information from the readings and materials used in the unit. After composing a draft, students will submit an initial draft to the instructor for feedback that pays particular attention to logical organization and transitions. After time to reflect and revise, students will confer with their peers, complete a peer review sheet, take additional time to revise, and then submit a final version of their essays. 

    2nd Nine Weeks Unit 3: Work and Consumerism Guiding Questions 

    • What is work ethic? 
    • Is work ethic alive in the twenty-first century? 
    • Is work a necessity/necessary evil, or does it provide its own reward? 
    • What is the social responsibility, if any, of people whose work has made them more than merely successful? 
    • What is the social responsibility, if any, of consumers in an increasingly global world? 

    Unit Goals 

    • Respond to readings using dialectical journal entries 
    • Learn how to balance narrative and commentary 
    • Complete timed assignments from past AP exams 
    • Explore images as a source of narratives 
    • Evaluate the credibility and reliability of speakers 
    • Use smooth transitions in comparisons without seeming mechanical 

    Major Paper #3: As students read the sources in this unit, they consider the speaker’s response to the guiding questions in the unit through a series of short assignments, receiving instructor feedback. Near the end of the unit, students write an analytical essay evaluating and comparing arguments made by the speakers of the texts used in this unit. Students choose four texts and one of the guiding questions from the unit. In their essays, students address how each speaker would respond to the guiding question, using supporting details from the text and their shorter assignments. Additionally, the students compare and contrast the speakers and evaluate the effectiveness of their approaches. Students will be required to submit an initial draft for instructor feedback. Students will be required to revise their essays before submitting a final draft. 

    Unit 4: Politics Guiding Questions 

    • What is the relationship between citizen and the state? 
    • What does it mean to be ‘political’? 
    • When and how can the individual become involved in politics? 
    • How does the written word influence politics? 

    Unit Goals 

    • Utilize quick-writes to generate ideas and form opinions 
    • Complete timed assignments from past AP exams 
    • Identify primary and secondary sources 
    • During the fourth unit, prior to the midyear exam, all students will meet with the instructor for a formal conference about their progress in the course. Using a portfolio of the students work, the instructor will discuss with the student his or strengths and weaknesses thus far, and make at least two specific goals for the student to work towards for the end of the year. The goals will be recorded and kept in the student’s portfolio. 

    Major Paper #4: Students write an analytical synthesis essay focused on the question of the relationship between the citizen and the state. Students present their personal perspective while evaluating the arguments of the speakers in readings from the unit. Students meet with peers before the due date to provide one another with focused feedback on their initial drafts. After 

    taking time to revise and review their work, students will submit a final draft. 

    Midyear Exam: Practice AP Exam 

    3rd Nine Weeks Unit 5: Community and Family Major Paper #5 Guiding Questions 

    • What is the relationship of the individual to the community? 
    • How does family shape identity? 

    Unit Goals 

    • Write reflective journal entries that connect personal experiences to readings 
    • Discuss pairing effective images with text 
    • Complete timed assignments from past AP exams 

    Major Paper #5: After reading and annotating Donald Murray’s “The Stranger in the Photo is Me,” students write their own personal essay. Following consultations with peers, they select personal photos (or a series of photographs) as points of departure for purposeful memoirs of their own that integrate images and related words. Each student is asked to use details, memories, perceptions, and ideas that can be gathered up and purposefully arranged. 

    Unit 6: Science and Technology Major Paper #6 Guiding Questions 

    • How are advances in society and technology affecting the way we define our humanity? 

    Unit Goals 

    • Continue to work with models of analytical, expository, and argumentative writing 
    • Use dialectical journals to respond to readings 
    • Complete timed assignments from past AP exams 
    • Review the basics of MLA style of citation; explore the differences between MLA, APA, and Chicago Style 
    • Conduct independent research related to class readings for an argumentative essay 
    • Revisit the use of graphs and infographics to convey information to an audience 

    Major Essay #6: Students will develop and submit an argument about a public policy related to the role of science and technology. Upon turning in their proposal, students will have a student/teacher conference to address the direction their research will take and will be required to meet two more times for teacher feedback through the writing process. Students will be 

    required to use a mixture of primary and secondary reputable sources. Students will use either the MLA or APA style to cite their sources. Students will also be required to incorporate a graph or infographic that supports their argument. 

    4th Nine Weeks Unit 7: Pop Culture Major Paper #7 Guiding Question 

    • To what extent does pop culture reflect our society’s values? 

    Unit Goals 

    • Adapt the rhetorical techniques of persuasive argumentation and expository description to visuals (film). 
    • Apply methods of research collection and outlining 
    • Apply MLA or APA citation rules 
    • Evaluate the quality/bias of information sources on and offline 
    • Complete timed assignments from past AP exams 
    • Review and discuss strategies for the AP exam 

    Major Paper #7: Students will consider the guiding question for this unit: to what extent does pop culture reflect our society’s values? Students will choose an example of popular culture--a film, a pop icon, a fictional character, etc. In a carefully crafted essay, students will present a brief narrative on that element of pop culture. Students will then carefully examine the role of their subject in American society and its impact through careful analysis. For example, a student might consider the film The Dark Knight Rises, its association with a violent shooting, and the national debate over gun ownership and gun control. Given the visual nature of pop culture, students will be required to select or construct an appropriate image to pair with the essay. During the writing process, students will meet with the instructor and their peers for feedback and suggestions as they conduct their research. Students will be required to make necessary revisions before submitting a final draft. 

    Parent or guardian contact information. This section is very important to ensure that you are kept up to date with your student’s progress in the class. 

    Student’s Name ______________________________________________________________

    Parent/Guardian Contact 1 Name _________________________________________________

    Parent/Guardian Contact 1 Cell Phone # ___________________________________________

    Parent/Guardian Contact 1 Email Address _________________________________________

    Parent/Guardian Contact 2 Name _________________________________________________

    Parent/Guardian Contact 2 Cell Phone # ___________________________________________

    Parent/Guardian Contact 2 Email Address__________________________________________

     

    Course Syllabus – 11th Grade American Literature and Composition

    2021-2022 School Year

    **At the end of the syllabus, you will find a section that must be completed by the parent or guardian.

    Supply List for your personal use:

    *Hand sanitizer-for your personal use

    *Tissues-for your personal use

    Earbuds for Chromebook - Please buy the $1 earbuds from Dollar Tree. Put these in a plastic ziplock bag with your name inside the bag, and submit it to me by August 16th. I will keep these for you, so you will have them when we need them.

    Pens/paper/highlighters/sticky notes

    3-4 pieces of poster board – which you will not bring to class until instructed to do so

    *I highly recommend a planner. You can download many for free, or choose to purchase a hard copy planner for your use.

    Course Overview:

    American Literature and Composition is a study of the major literary topics and themes across the history of the United States from pre-colonial times to present day. Students will focus on the major literary forms of the emerging nation, analyze the literary themes and trends, and research and compose several papers, speeches, and presentations using representative forms of discourse.

    Grading

    Milestone Assessment

    American Literature is a Milestone End-of-Course Assessment class. This test represents 20% of a student’s total course grade. The categories below represent the remaining 80%: 

    All formative assessments will count as 40% of your grade.

    All summative assessments will count as 60% of your grade.



    Effingham College and Career Academy

    Make-Up Work and Late Work Procedures

    Effingham College and Career Academy has established make-up work and late work procedures with regard to the acceptance and credit awarded for work that is turned in by students beyond a set deadline.  The expectation is that all students will turn in assignments on time; however, when this does not occur, we need to encourage students to show responsibility for their learning by completing the assignments.

    The philosophy of awarding partial credit for late work takes into account the following: the teacher had a valid reason for assigning the work, the assignment is aligned to the curriculum, and the assignment is designed to help inform the student and teacher of the student’s level of mastery of the course standards.

    Late Work is defined as any work completed and turned in after a designated due date.  ECCA will follow the following procedures for late work:

    Students will have three days from the designated due date to turn in work.

    1 day late = a deduction of 11 points off of the earned grade

    2 days late = a deduction of 22 points off of the earned grade

    3 days late = a deduction of 33 points off of the earned grade

    No grade higher than 50% will be awarded for completed assignments turned in after day three

    No late work will be accepted the last week of the grading period for each nine weeks.

    Make-Up Work is defined as any assignments or tests students need to complete due to an excused absence.  Students may make up assignments for full credit by following the procedure below according to the Effingham County Make-Up Policy:

    Students have three days to make up any work missed from an absence. If a student has not turned in make-up work by day three, then refer to the late work procedures listed above.

    Note that previously announced projects, tests or quizzes that have been scheduled BEFORE a student is absent MUST be made up the day the student returns to school.

     

    Academic Integrity Statement

    Honesty, integrity, and mutual respect are necessary for true learning.  To maintain and support the academic honesty, integrity, and mutual respect of the school community by completing all assigned work, activities, and tests in an honorable manner according to the stated policies without engaging in cheating, fraud, or plagiarism is the responsibility of the student.

     

    Discipline

    All ECCA and ECSD policies regarding discipline can be found in the student handbook. You will be expected to adhere to these policies.

    Text(s):Please note that I reserve the right to change the texts as I must follow all copyright and fair use guidelines.

     

    • Pearson The American Experience
    • The Crucible by Arthur Miller (available in textbook)
    • The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald (you will be assigned a copy of this novel)

    Unit 1: 4 ½ weeks

    Fear and Persecution in Early American Literature

    Priority Standards Skills & Concepts

    • Cite Strong and thorough textual evidence
    • Write arguments to support claims
    • Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions
    • Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage
    • Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective

    Anchor and Supplemental TextThe Crucible by Arthur Miller

    • “The Earth on Turtle’s Back”
    • “To My Dear and Loving Husband”
    • from “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God”
    • from “Of Plymouth Plantation”
    • “Speech in the Virginia Convention”

    *Literature of the American Revolution

    Additional Supplemental Texts

    • from The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin by Benjamin Franklin
    • excerpts by Benjamin Franklin

    Unit 2: 4 ½ weeks

    The Individual versus Society: Exploring a New Frontier

    Priority Standards Skills & Concepts

    • Cite Strong and thorough textual evidence
    • Determine two or more themes or central ideas of text
    • Determine an author’s point of view or purpose
    • Write informative/explanatory texts
    • Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions
    • Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage

    Anchor and Supplemental Texts

    • Walden by Henry David Thoreau
    • “The Devil and Tom Walker” by Washington Irving
    • “The Minister’s Black Veil,” Nathaniel Hawthorne
    • “The Fall of the House of Usher,” “The Black Cat,” “The Raven”
    • “Because I Could Not Stop for Death,” “She Sweeps with Many-Colored Brooms,” “I Heard a Fly Buzz When I Died,” Emily Dickinson

    Additional Supplemental Texts

    • “Psalm of my Life,” H.W. Longfellow
    • “Self Reliance,” Ralph Waldo Emerson

    Unit 3: 4 ½ weeks

    Reconstructing the American Dream

    Priority Standards Skills & Concepts

    • Cite Strong and thorough textual evidence
    • Write arguments to support claims
    • Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions
    • Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage

    Anchor and Supplemental Texts

    • The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
    • “A Rose for Emily”
    • “Success is Counted Sweetest”
    • “Beat, Beat Drums”
    • “War is Kind”
    • “O Captain, My Captain”
    • The Gettysburg Address
    • The Second Inaugural Address
    • from My Bondage and My Freedom

    Additional Supplemental Texts

    • “An Episode of War”
    • “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge”

    Unit 4: 4 ½ weeks

    Modern Times, Modern Issues

    Priority Standards Skills & Concepts

    • Cite Strong and thorough textual evidence
    • Write arguments to support claims
    • Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions
    • Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage

    Thematically Connected SHORT INFORMATIONAL TEXTS

    • Bill of Rights, historical document
    • Preamble to the Constitution, historical document
    • Declaration of Independence (revisit), historical document
    • “I Have a Dream,” (Martin Luther King, Jr., speech)
    • “The Ballot or the Bullet,” Malcolm X, speech
    • “Civil Rights Address,” John F. Kennedy, speech
    • “Remarks on the Assassination of Martin Luther King” Robert Kennedy, speech

    Thematically Connected SHORT LITERARY TEXTS

    • “Mother to Son,” Langston Hughes, poem
    • “Dream Deferred,” Langston Hughes,
    • “Harlem Dancer,” Claude McKay, poem
    • “America,” Claude McKay, poem
    • “Incident,” Countee Cullen, poem
    • “Go Down Death,” James Weldon Johnson, poem





    Parent or guardian contact information. This section is very important to ensure that you are kept up to date with your student’s progress in the class. 

    Student’s Name ______________________________________________________________

    Parent/Guardian Contact 1 Name _________________________________________________

    Parent/Guardian Contact 1 Cell Phone # ___________________________________________

    Parent/Guardian Contact 1 Email Address _________________________________________

    Parent/Guardian Contact 2 Name _________________________________________________

    Parent/Guardian Contact 2 Cell Phone # ___________________________________________

    Parent/Guardian Contact 2 Email Address__________________________________________






    10th Grade English Syllabus

    2021-2022 Effingham College and Career Academy

    **At the end of the syllabus, you will find a section that must be completed by the parent or guardian.

     

    Supply List for your personal use:

    •  *Hand sanitizer-for your personal use
    • *Tissues-for your personal use
    •  Earbuds for Chromebook Please buy the $1 earbuds from Dollar Tree. Put these in a plastic ziplock bag with your name inside the bag, and submit it to me by August 16th. I will keep these for you, so you will have them when we need them.
    •  Pens/paper/highlighters/sticky notes
    • 3-4 pieces of poster board – do not bring to class until instructed to do so
    •       *I highly recommend a planner. You can download many for free, or choose to purchase a hard copy planner for your use.

    Grading

    All formative assessments will count as 40% of your grade.

    All summative assessments will count as 60% of your grade.

    Due Date Policy/Make-up Work

    Effingham College and Career Academy

    Make-Up Work and Late Work Procedures

    Effingham College and Career Academy has established make-up work and late work procedures with regard to the acceptance and credit awarded for work that is turned in by students beyond a set deadline.  The expectation is that all students will turn in all assignments on time; however, when this does not occur, we need to encourage students to show responsibility for their learning by completing the assignments.

    The philosophy of awarding partial credit for late work takes into account the following: the teacher had a valid reason for assigning the work, the assignment is aligned to the curriculum, and the assignment is designed to help inform the student and teacher of the student’s level of mastery of the course standards.

    Late Work is defined as any work completed and turned in after a designated due date.  ECCA will follow the following procedures for late work:

    Students will have three days from the designated due date to turn in work.

    1 day late = a deduction of 11 points off of the earned grade

    2 days late = a deduction of 22 points off of the earned grade

    3 days late = a deduction of 33 points off of the earned grade

    After 3 days = No grade higher than 50% will be given for completed assignments turned in after day 3.

    No late work will be accepted the last week of the grading period for each nine weeks.

    Make-Up Work is defined as any assignments or tests students need to complete due to an excused absence.  Students may make up assignments for full credit by following the procedure below according to the Effingham County Make-Up Policy:

    Students have three days to make up any work missed from an absence. If a student has not turned in make-up work by day three, then refer to the late work procedures listed above.

    Note that previously announced projects, tests or quizzes that have been scheduled BEFORE a student is absent MUST be made up the day the student returns to school.




    Schoology and Classroom Procedures

    I will be using the learning management system Schoology.  A daily agenda will be uploaded to this platform every day. This is your primary resource for retrieving homework assignments, completing projects, downloading notes or watching lectures and/or videos. I am requiring you to check the Schoology site every day. It needs to be a part of your daily routine.  You will utilize this platform through your Chromebooks, so detailed instructions will be provided in class during the first few days of school.  

    If you would like to look at the Schoology platform click here:  http://bit.ly/schoologyStudent                                              

    Academic Integrity Statement

    Honesty, integrity, and mutual respect are necessary for true learning. To maintain and support the academic honesty, integrity, and mutual respect of the school community by completing all assigned work, activities, and tests in an honorable manner according to the stated policies without engaging in cheating, fraud, or plagiarism is the responsibility of the student.

    Discipline

    All ECCA and ECSD policies regarding discipline can be found in the student handbook. You will be expected to adhere to these policies

    Course Description

    English literature is a four-year requirement. It is an intensive literature program that introduces the students to a variety of classical, contemporary, and multicultural literature that reflect the reciprocal nature of the relationship between culture and writing. Students analyze literature to determine how it relates to them and to the world around them. This course introduces students to the genres of literature, including fiction and nonfiction. Critical thinking and self-expression are emphasized in the study of vocabulary, grammar, usage, and the fundamental elements of the expository, argumentative, and explanatory writing. Literature and writing will consist of themes such as moral courage and endurance, the importance of place in life and literature, the many faces of the hero, expanding spaces – seeing beyond horizons and limitations, and connecting the humanities with STEM.

    Writing will be intensive in preparing students for the upper grades. The course will introduce and develop students’ abilities to analyze, explain, argue, inform, and express ideas with clarity and coherence, structure ideas and arguments in a sustained and logical way, and support them with relevant examples in an insightful and sophisticated analysis. All levels of English literature emphasize the use of correct grammar with appropriate and varied sentence structure, showing an awareness of audience and effective and purposeful use of register in formal and informal writings, and formal and informal oral presentations

     

    Texts: Please note that I reserve the right to change the texts as I must follow all copyright and fair use guidelines.

     

    We will examine the following texts:

    •     Pearson Common Core Literature
    •   Animal Farm by George Orwell
    • The Hot Zone by Richard Preston
    •  Selected poems and short stories

    Writing

    Activities will consist of routine literary analyses, technical writing for STEM, expository, argumentative, explanatory, and short narrative writing tasks.



    Speaking and Listening

    A combination of group work, classroom discussion, Socratic Seminars, projects (10th grade honors), class presentations, and online work will collectively leverage group knowledge as we explore the courses themes. One three to five minute speech will count as an assessment grade.

    Language

    Conventions, parallel structure, and proper MLA and APA formatting will be studied.

    Course Objectives

    By the end of the semester, students will have developed skills important to literary and STEM study, such as:

    •         Careful and analytical reading of academic prose, novels, drama, and poetry
    •         Ability to situate oneself in a critical conversation
    •         Ability to work constructively within the confines of a group project
    •         Ability to use an engineering design-based reasoning process to solve a problem
    •         Ability to create a logically coherent thesis
    •         Ability to analyze literature critically
    •         Ability to compose different forms of writing for different purposes



     

     

    Parent or guardian contact information. This section is very important to ensure that you are kept up to date with your student’s progress in the class. 

    Student’s Name ______________________________________________________________

    Parent/Guardian Contact 1 Name _________________________________________________

    Parent/Guardian Contact 1 Cell Phone # ___________________________________________

    Parent/Guardian Contact 1 Email Address _________________________________________

    Parent/Guardian Contact 2 Name _________________________________________________

    Parent/Guardian Contact 2 Cell Phone # ___________________________________________

    Parent/Guardian Contact 2 Email Address__________________________________________




    Publications: The Journalism Class is tasked with the responsibility of creating the ECCA Yearbook as well as creating and designing the monthly “Student Voice” page in The Effingham Herald. Each member of the class will be responsible for some aspect of these publications.

    Grading

    All formative assessments will count as 40% of your grade.

    All summative assessments will count as 60% of your grade.

     

    Course Description

     

    • Journalistic Laws & Ethics
      • Students understand and apply knowledge of legal and ethical principles related to the functioning of a free and independent press.
    • Journalistic Research & Writing
      • Students progress through the stages of the writing process, writing clear, coherent content that demonstrates well-researched information, appropriate journalistic structure and style, and a logical and concise flow of ideas.
    • Technology & Visual Design
      • Students select and use appropriate technological devices to implement design standards in the creation of effective, aesthetically pleasing media formats for publication.
    • Publication Management & Organization PMO
      • Students manage and complete the publication process as a team, applying appropriate skill sets to be productive in a changing technological, diverse workplace to be able to work independently and apply teamwork skills.



    Georgia Course Standards

    To see detailed list of standards and elements, please visit: https://www.georgiastandards.org/Georgia-Standards/Documents/ELA-9-12-Journalism-Georgia-Standards.pdf 

     

    ELAGSEJ.PMO1

    Devise and carry out long-term and short-term plans and deadlines.

    ELAGSEJ.PMO2

    Utilize teamwork and peer leadership.

    ELAGSEJ.PMO3

    Practice the business of journalism.

    ELAGSEJ.PMO4

    Demonstrate proper use and care of equipment and materials.

    ELAGSEJ.PMO5

    Acquire knowledge of file management and apply accordingly.

    ELAGSEJ.PMO6

    Examine scholastic and professional press organizations as resources for student journalists.

    ELAGSEJ.PMO7

    Gain and utilize a working vocabulary regarding publication management and organization in the journalism field.











     





     

     

     

     

     

Last Modified on August 2, 2021